4 Common Myths About Edibles Debunked



As legal marijuana has swept throughout communities across the nation, the popularity of edibles has risen dramatically. People that have access to legal marijuana have the option of either purchasing edibles from a dispensary, or making their own homemade versions.

Unfortunately, some people have held back from indulging in edibles due to myths that have been spread about consuming them. The widespread popularity of edibles over the course of the past several years has led to the development of numerous myths. And while some are harmless, others perpetuate inaccurate and harmful narratives about marijuana. Here are four of the most common ones.

RELATED: How Regulations For Edibles Vary Across the Country

Overconsumption can be fatal

Since edibles often have a high concentration of THC, it’s not uncommon for people who eat one to become concerned that they’re feeling the effects of it a little too strongly. Even though that’s the case, there’s no need to worry that overindulging on an edible could lead to an accidental fatal overdose.

While edibles contain a higher concentration of THC than your average joint, they still contain nowhere near the amount necessary to cause a fatal marijuana overdose. 

Edibles perform best as desserts

The concept of edibles working best when served as a dessert isn’t surprising given how “weed brownies” have become synonymous with the consumption of edibles. The popularity of cannabis-infused candies only perpetuates this falsehood. 

The root of the myth that edibles are best served as desserts is based on a story that one of the earliest recipes on record for edibles consisted of brownies (which actually weren’t brownies at all) made by one of the nation’s earliest pot pioneers, affectionately nicknamed “Brownie Marie”. Another reason why edibles are most commonly associated with desserts is because flavors like peanut butter and chocolate can do wonders as far as masking the taste of cannabis goes.

Raw marijuana has the same effects as an edible

One of the most consequential mistakes anyone can make is deciding to make their own homemade edibles under the pretense that doing so is as simple as adding weed into cake mix. In actuality, you need to first undergo a process called decarboxylation, which activates the THC.  

Cannabis that hasn’t undergone this process won’t possess the psychoactive effects that people are seeking, which means adding raw cannabis to any recipe is a waste if getting high is your goal.

RELATED: Is Your Cannabis Safe? 5 Questions To Ask Yourself

Labels are always accurate

Getting the most value out of a purchase is the goal of every smart consumer. When it comes to shopping for edibles, that probably means going for the ones with the highest THC percentage. Since that information is provided by products that are sold at dispensaries, most people probably assume that finding a potent edible on the shelves should be easy enough.

Even though most people would assume that products coming directly from a lab are measured to perfection, this idea couldn’t be further from the truth. A study conducted by The New York Times analyzed the ingredients in 75 edibles and found that just 17 of them had accurate depictions of their THC levels. Since the legal marijuana industry is still relatively young, it’s safe to assume that it could be awhile before the problems regarding mislabeling and false advertising of THC levels gets corrected.



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